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First Poems

George Campbell’s poems began appearing in 1930s and blasted through the colonial Victorianism of current Jamaican poetry. Dubbed ‘the poet of the revolution’ by Jamaica’s founding political father, Norman Manley, Campbell was part of a distinguished group of artists including sculptor Edna Manley and novelists Roger Mais and VS Reid. He was the one Caribbean poet whom Derek Walcott acknowledged as an inspiration.

£9.99

Author(s)
George Campbell
ISBN
9781845231491
Pages
180
Price
£9.99
Classification
Caribbean Modern Classics, Poetry
Setting
Jamaica
Date published
15 Feb 2012

George Campbell wrote about the struggle for independence, such as the imprisonment of militants by the British colonial authorities; he wrote about the appalling social conditions that drove the Jamaican masses to revolt – poverty, underemployment and squalid housing; he wrote about the rising consciousness of black Jamaicans, in their attempts to overcome centuries of oppression; he wrote out of a consciousness of history; he wrote about the hopes and consolations to be derived from religious faith, but a faith in which, for him, Jesus and Lenin were not incompatible icons. He also wrote about love, its ecstasies and bitter disappointments, and some of his very best poems are luminous celebrations of Jamaica’s natural beauty.

George Campbell was born of Jamaican parents in Panama in 1916, and lived variously in Columbia and Costa Rica before returning to Jamaica. A celebrated journalist and critic, he was co-founder with Edna Manley of the literary magazine Focus."

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George Campbell

George Campbell was born of Jamaican parents in Panama in 1916 and lived variously in Columbia and Costa Rica before returning to Jamaica.

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