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Call for subs: BIM, edited by Esther Phillips

Esther Phillips, as editor for BIM: Arts for the 21st Century, invites submissions for its March 2019 edition.

To enhance its accessibility (and affordability), BIM will also be switching to a primarily online presence, with a limited print presence.

The vision for BIM: Arts for the 21st Century has always been that it is a Caribbean magazine reaching out to the region, its diaspora and well beyond. That vision continues.

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Filigree in the writing of Black British poets

The absence of ‘filigree’ from everyday use means there were no obvious or pre-ordained routes to approaching the word, giving the poets free rein to draw from it what they would and play with the subtleties of what they found. The subsequent poetry that fills the pages of this anthology is rich with different styles and forms. Take, for instance, Akila Richards’ first line in ‘Al zhie mer’: ‘Mem orisha ng lik e bird nests’.

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#WATCH: Roy McFarlane reading from Filigree

Roy McFarlane reads 'Dancing with Ghosts' at the Kadija Sesay & Friends event at the Barbican Library. This was part of the first preview reading from Filigree: Contemporary Black British Poets, published under our Inscribe imprint. Roy knows how to deliver 'Pentecost' as poetry!

Roy's new collection is called The Healing Next Time with Nine Arches Press - JUST  OUT!

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Inscribe writer Adam Lowe and author Una Marson join Grace Nichols and John Agard at British Library

Entrance Hall, The British Library, 96 Euston Road, London NW1 2DB
Fri 1 Jun - Sun 21 Oct 2018
Price: Free
More information

Inscribe-supported writer Adam Lowe appears as part of the British Library's Windrush exhibition, alongside videos by John Agard, Grace Nichols, Hannah Lowe, Maggie Harris and Kim O’Loughlin.

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Full of Life workshops with Jocelyn Watson

Leeds: Saturday 6 October, 11am-4pm; The Leeds Library LS1 (Book)
London: Saturday 3 November, 11am-4pm; Torriano Meeting House NW5 (Book)
Price: £15 / £12 (concessions)

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NCJAA: What does success look like for arts in criminal justice settings?

What does success look like for arts in criminal justice settings? is the bold new paper from the National Criminal Justice Arts Alliance (NCJAA), commissioned by Arts Council England in 2017, highlights the findings from a series of roundtables which considered the titular question. The paper has special relevance to writers and artists working in criminal justice settings, such as writers-in-residence at prisons.

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New Poetry Anthology of Black British Poets: Exploring the subtleties of ‘Filigree’

Filigree is the second anthology of contemporary Black British poetry published by Peepal Tree Press, a leader in Caribbean and Black British literature. It follows in the footsteps of previous successful anthologies: Red: Contemporary Black British Poetry (edited by Kwame Dawes) and Closure: Contemporary Black British Short Stories (edited by Jacob Ross).

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Writing Black, writing trauma

'Who would I be without my misery? Keeping calm about Black life has never remained an option,' writes Rashad Mubarak in his essay on 'The Trauma of Being A Black Writer'.

Read the article over at Medium.

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Call for submissions: Race, Gender, Austerity Hope and Resistance

Please circulate widely. Shared here for information only (this isn't a Peepal Tree project).

Race, Gender, Austerity Hope and Resistance strategy, organisation and change

An open call for intersectional articles, images, photography, artwork, graphic novel extracts, satirical cartoons and poetry by women.

On the themes of race, gender, austerity, hope and resistance - strategy, organisation and change.

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Valda Jackson: Still Holding On

This work is constructed from images created over decades. Photographs taken 50-60 years ago are positioned with studio images against a background of English oak. In the centre is ‘Waiting’, a charcoal painting made 30 years ago. Farthest left, a more recent drawing in graphite is balanced by a newer work, a painting still in progress. The figures represent children whose parents came to Britain from the Caribbean between 1948 and the 1970s. The children might have come with their parents, some would have travelled alone to join parents, and some were born here.

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